Government framework win for BW: Workplace Experts

BW has been awarded a position on the government framework agreement for the Southern lot of the Government Hubs Fit-Out Framework. One government department to use the framework will be HMRC; their current estate of 140 offices will be re-orientated into 13 modern regional centres. This is a 4-year framework that covers the South of the UK (South of Peterborough and Birmingham inclusive) for projects with a construction value of under £25m.

Anthony Brown, Sales and Marketing Director at BW, says: “Alongside the City University framework, this appointment further underpins our determination to secure several significant formal frameworks, taking the BW business to the next level.”

Driven by innovation and characterised by transparency, personality and fit out expertise, London-based BW brings a commitment to delivering defect-free fit out and refurbishment projects to London and the south of England. Visit wearebw.com to view some recently completed projects, our externally facing team and some recent company news.

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Boat firm lets Energy Management take the strain

Steve Retford from Energy Management LLP is proud to announce that popular holiday boat hire company Sally Narrowboats has renewed its contract with the Wiltshire-based company after achieving savings of over 10 per cent on its energy usage in the last 12 months.

As well as powering a 26-strong fleet, Sally Narrowboats offer a full repair and maintenance service for passing traffic on the Kennet & Avon Canal at its dry dock facility in the picturesque Bradford-on-Avon Marina.

Sally Narrowboats General Manager Mark Fraser says seeking external help in energy management has brought about noticeable benefits to the company, and not just financial.

“Thanks to the energy efficiency measures put in place by Energy Management, we have reduced our energy usage by 10.3 per cent over the last year.

“Energy Management assisted us with some upgrade works in our office space and in the workshop and warehouse as well as helping us negotiate the best possible deals with energy suppliers.

“Originally, we had standard light bulbs installed in high-level fittings that constantly needed changing and were troublesome to get to because of their location. We’ve since had LED lights fitted, which have a five-year lifespan, and less time is now spent on maintenance.”

Energy usage can amount to a third of a company’s overall bills, yet, in the experience of Energy Management CEO Retford, an engineer with over 25 years of industry experience, there are obvious areas where savings are achievable.

For example, as many as one in five invoices seen by Energy Management over the last two decades have been found to be inaccurate. These errors typically can result in an increase of 3-5 per cent of business energy bills.

“Invoice validation is one of our core services. Whether it’s down to inaccurate meter readings, wrongly applied correction and volume factors or CCL and VAT charges, customers often pay more than they should for their energy.  Our invoice validation service uses a thorough invoice-checking system that shines a light on any errors, so that action can be taken to recover any overcharges as quickly as possible.

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SICK’s Visionary Camera Takes 3D Images in a Snapshot

SICK has launched the Visionary-T,  its first robust, industrial imaging camera to capture high-resolution 3D data with a single ‘snapshot’, whether the object is stationary or moving.

The SICK Visionary-T uses high-resolution Time-of–Flight (TOF) technology to achieve superior quality 3D imaging for vision applications.  Unlike 3D vision systems based on laser triangulation, the 3D image is captured with one shot of light, without the need to profile a moving object.

While single shot imaging systems have already been introduced for consumer applications, the IP67-rated SICK Visionary-T is designed for 24/7 industrial use in rugged conditions.  The camera therefore offers an affordable alternative to high-end 3D vision systems so that manufacturers and machine builders can integrate 3D imaging into intrusion detection systems for building security applications, for example in museums and art galleries.

Explains Neil Sandhu, SICK’s National Product Manager for Imaging, Measurement, Ranging and Systems:

“The Visionary T builds up a detailed and accurate real-time 3D image of fixed or moving objects with excellent results regardless of angle, surface finish, material or shape of object. The Snapshot technology means it is not necessary to design a system in which either the camera or the object must move across a laser line to create a triangulated image.

“In a single shot, the Visionary T combines different aspects of the light scattered by the object to build up a detailed picture of shape, distance, reflectivity and object depth.  Our trials have shown that the single shot method performs well, with less false imaging than can occur with some of the other commonly used methods, and lead to far more reliable results over a wide range of conditions.”

The SICK Visionary-T uses Time-of-Flight measurement of a light signal between the device and the target for each point of the image. The CCD/CMOS imager develops a pixel matrix, with each pixel containing depth and intensity information.  The camera is designed to capture more than 25,000 distance and intensity values to create real time 3D images at up to 30 frames per second.

Available in two different models, the SICK Visionary-T CX delivers raw data as depth, intensity and confidence values without any post-processing or reduction for in-house processing and program formulation, while the Visionary-T AG outputs filtered data in formats pre-selected by the integrator, OEM or other user. Likely to be used primarily for robot related tasks, typical data handling includes axis manipulation, parameter configuration, polar, scalable height integration time and different filter types.

Easy to mount, either on a vehicle or frame at the optimum angle for operation, the SICK Visionary-T is fitted with an industrial standard API connector for easy communication of the 3D data for evaluation on an external computer. Data can be read or recorded either directly via SICK’s SOPAS interface or via API for matlab, java or C++, and the SICK Visionary-T is compatible with SICK’s IDpro platform for integration with other SICK vision and sensor devices.

For more information about the SICK Visionary-T, please contact Andrea Hornby on 01727 831121 or email andrea.hornby@sick.co.uk.

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Press Release: Star Players join BW

BW: Workplace Experts has recruited a number of high profile industry professionals to further strengthen the BW team these are:

Dale Harding – Commercial Director

Alan Sandell – Project Director

Clive Yorath – Contracts Manager

Pete Flynn – Contracts Manager

Dale Harding, previously the Managing Director of OD Interiors is appointed as Commercial Director of BW’s Core team, working closely with Peter Nagle in his new role as Operations Director.

Dale has over 25 years of experience in the fit out and refurbishment sector, with companies such as Mansell, Overbury and Mitie Interiors.

Dale Harding, Commercial Director at BW comments: “ I am delighted to be joining BW at this exciting next stage of its  development. I have watched this dynamic business go from strength to strength and I am excited to be part of its continued success.”

Alan Sandell joins from Overbury in the position of Project Director. Alan began his career as a carpenter, quickly progressing through the management structure to work on a number of high profile projects in both construction and fit out sector in the retail, education, leisure, media and commercial sectors.

Alan Sandell, Project Director at BW says: “I am looking forward to pursuing the extensive opportunities presented by BW, It is a fantastic opportunity to share the wealth of knowledge and experience gained. I share the companies values and principles to deliver to the highest standards with in the industry.”

Clive Yorath, previously Construction Director at Citysq Ltd will join BW as Contracts Manager. Clive has vast experience in the industry managing large projects across many sectors including high quality (end-user) residential, heavy structural commercial office refurbishment, Cat B office fit out and Grade listed offices. 

Clive Yorath, Contracts Manager at BW says: “When I left Citysq, I intentionally took time assessing a number of different businesses in the market and I was overwhelmed with BW’s authentic vision for the future of the business. There is a buzz about BW in the market and the progressive thinking behind that is palpable when you are with the team.”

Pete Flynn has also been appointed as Contract Manager at BW, moving from Overbury, he is Chartered Builder and Chartered Civil Engineer with over 30 years of experience in the sector. Pete Flynn is delighted to join the equally experienced management team at BW, he says: “The BW team is very focused on delivering a great customer experience and journey with exciting plans to grow BW’s market share significantly in the next few years. This is a great time to join this dynamic and exciting business.”

Visit wearebw.com to view some recently completed projects, our externally facing team and some recent company news.

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New telephone pod brings peace of mind

In response to the trend for enclosed private areas that facilitate individual headspace and support increased focus and privacy in the workplace, Boss Design has widened its popular range of telephone pods to include TP4.

TP4 provides a much-needed place to concentrate and deliberate, and is ergonomically a better solution for short-term periods of focused work. Incorporating an integral shelving option, this latest pod provides the ideal area to make private calls and encourages creative and individual working – all vital for a more productive working environment.

Commenting on this latest addition, Sales Director, Oliver Ronald, says: “Lack of privacy and noise are two of the biggest gripes of the open plan office. Our popular range of telephone pods not only help eliminate distractions, they are designed to meet the needs of the multi- workplace.

“TP4 goes one step further in providing the perfect getaway space to ‘drop in’ to or make a private call, by offering a short-term solution to focused working that many offices can’t provide. It also leaves meeting rooms free for larger groups that need the space,” adds Oliver.

TP4 is PIR operated, featuring single LED down lights, LED extrusion in the square tile and LED sheet tiling – enabling the whole panel to be illuminated – to support close, accurate working. Exterior wooden cladding options, together with an extensive choice of fabric bands and white, red and green occupancy lighting, all contribute to the optimum look and feel of this model. Furthermore, the pod may be personalised to suit individual business needs and branding.

Alongside TP4, Boss Design offers three other telephone pods. Whilst TP1 provides the perfect getaway space and offers the ideal solution for individual privacy, TP2 comes complete with a shelving area to place working or personal items, and is perfect for short periods of headspace. TP3 incorporates all of these features with the added option of personalising the space with branding or other designs.

Contact:
Boss Design: +44 (0) 1384 455570 Boss Design London Showroom: +44 (0) 20 7253 0364 www.boss-design.com

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The air that I breathe

Dave Carson from P-Wave says that although washrooms play an essential part in our health, comfort and wellbeing, all too often they fail to reach the required standards; but it doesn’t have to be that way.

The Hollies, and later Simply Red – though we won’t talk about that – had a hit containing the lyric “Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe…”. I’ll be honest and admit I’m pretty sure they weren’t talking to about washrooms, but you could be forgiven for thinking they may have been given the unpleasant aromas that envelop all too many of these facilities. Sometimes visitors really are left gasping for breath after taking a ‘comfort’ break.

A facility’s washroom is rarely neglected – and often there will be inspection records or even customer feedback buttons to prove it – but unfortunately they often look and smell like they are a low priority to the buildings management. Even with high specification fixtures and fittings and regular cleaning, the overriding impression can be of an unpleasant pong, making a visit a less than favourable experience.

The power of smell

It is a very subjective topic, but many believe smell to be the most powerful of our senses. Whether that’s true is for better minds than mine to decide, but smell certainly plays an important part in our lives, whether evoking memories or warning of danger. When you are exposed to a bad smell you certainly know about it. This makes getting the washroom experience right vital to the overall impression of your building. Even if facilities are cleaned regularly, a bad smell will give the opposite impression, so the last thing you want to leave people with is a lasting memory of an unpleasant smell.

Given the disproportionate amount of a facilities manager’s time and effort washrooms involve, it’s no wonder that there are many hundreds of products on the market looking to resolve the issue. However, unfortunately many air freshening options just don’t live up to their inventively scented names or last the distance. The right products can beat the smell over a sustained period of time, tackle odour causing bacteria and reduce maintenance issues, such as blocked drains.

Five hints to help tackle nuisance odours

  1. Air fresheners

Perhaps an obvious option when taking on bad smells, but get the right one and it really will improve the atmosphere in your washrooms. Look for products containing strong, pleasant fragrances that can effectively mask bad odours. These can make an immediate and long-lasting improvement. Users should feel welcomed by the scent rather than repelled by an unpleasant stench. As well as whole room air fresheners, look for washroom specific products like toilet bowl clips and urinal fresheners.

  1. Everything in its place

The main cause of bad smells in the washroom is bacteria from urine in drains or splashback on the floor. Once the only way to tackle this was to drop a scented blue block into urinals and hope for the best. However, with new products 95% of splash back can be prevented thanks to new protrusions on urinal and trough screens.

This keeps urine off the floor and grouting where it would soak in and cause a bad smell, even with regular cleaning.

  1. Keep the pipes clear

Debris such as discarded bits of chewing gum or tissue can cause blockages in pipes resulting in slow flowing water or worse blockages and overflows. These can be minimised by choosing urinal or trough screens which can trap this sort of material and stop it getting into the drains.

  1. Get additional help

It’s not just the cleaners who help reduce the smells in washrooms, products which include the right enzymes – or odour controlling ‘good’ bacteria – can help eliminate malodourous ‘bad’ bacteria which feeds on urine. Cutting out the smell at source in this way is far more effective and environmentally friendly using an array of harsh chemicals.

Reduced chemical use has many advantages, not least from a health and safety point of view as there is less danger of spillage.

  1. You get what you pay for

It’s easy to think all products are the same, or that it’s not worth investing in washroom products. I think it’s worth paying that bit extra for quality as it can soon bring its rewards. For example, the best urinal screens will combine a strong air freshener, with splash back control and odour tackling enzymes; removing the need to buy separate products. Top quality products can last a month resulting in cost savings in the longer term and reducing the time spent cleaning the washroom and purchasing products.

…And to love you

Washrooms are crucial in maintaining building users’ health and wellbeing, especially through hand washing. However, a bad smell can put people off using them, or staying long enough to wash their hands properly – with the result that germs are more likely to be spread throughout a facility, with a likely impact on sickness and absenteeism.

The second part of the song lyric mentioned earlier is, of course, ‘…and to love you’. Now I’m not saying a better smelling washroom will make your visitors and staff fall in love with you, but by providing hygienic and lasting solutions, you and your building could certainly go up in their estimation!

www.p-wave.co.uk

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Surge in electro-mechanical hardware makes ongoing FM training more important than ever

 

Allegion UK Commercial Leader Pete Hancox suggests that facilities management training needs to keep pace with rapidly developing building technologies for building and occupant wellbeing.

In the UK, the staff who manage our facilities can come from all walks of life. Ask any facilities manager about how they got into the trade, and then go and ask another, and you will more than likely get two different answers.

Why is this? Traditionally, people in the Facilities Management sector have often ‘fallen into’ the industry, explained the FMJ (Facilities Management Journal) in their ‘From the tools: The Making of the Manager?’ feature (March 2017). Our facilities managers could have worked their way up from frontline positions such as cleaning, catering, engineering or security. Increasingly, we can also see academic graduates choosing facilities management roles, too.

To become a facilities manager, the UK’s National Careers Service website simply states that “there are no set requirements, but you’ll usually need a qualification in facilities management.” Once you become a facilities manager, bodies like the British Institute of Facilities Management and Royal Institute of British Architects can provide training and CPD courses, but it is all optional to development – there is no legal requirement to train.

This is in stark contrast to other professions where wellbeing is concerned. Take gas engineers, for instance. Gas engineers in the UK, according to a leading jobs website, reed.co.uk, must have relevant qualifications, usually an NVQ Level 3 in Gas Installation, and also be Gas Safe registered. Apprenticeship is a common route for attaining a gas engineer position, too.

Of course, diversity in our industry is welcome, and diversity is known to bring outside-of-the-box solutions. However when we start comparing the two professions, we can start to see how gas engineers will be ‘singing from the same hymn sheet,’ whereas our facilities managers could be working from all manner of different pages.

For the future of facilities management, this very diversity could potentially be harming our buildings, and our occupants’ wellbeing, as opposed to aiding them. We could be creating an environment where knowledge levels, procedures, best practices and the way building hardware solutions are selected is all different and varied.

While it could be years before we reach a standardised route similar to that of gas engineers, we should at least be encouraging our facilities managers to complete ongoing training, particularly to keep pace with daily developments.

The Electro-Mechanical Game Changer

 We are now coming to a stage in the door hardware industry where development is rapidly overtaking existing knowledge. Electro-mechanical ‘smart’ hardware means the ability to unlock doors from phones, control access to secure areas and remotely lockdown, these are all functions that would be greatly beneficial in any facility manager’s life.

Fully integrated building solutions and biometrics are also becoming more readily available and affordable, so that we can give our facilities managers greater control over their buildings, as well as scalability for the future.

Choosing the right solution is a lot more difficult though, one which requires a comprehensive analysis of the building, the users, the ongoing maintenance and the ability to upscale or upgrade in future.

Ongoing training is crucial in this respect. Without a proper understanding of the technology, it can be quite easy to make a decision that is not beneficial to the long term sustainability of the building. For the facilities management team, it can eventually lead back to compromising health and safety.

A case in point happened as recently as 2016, when a fire door in a hospital that was fitted with a self-closing device shut on an elderly patient, causing injury. Unfortunately, this injury contributed to that patient’s death. Intended to be an aid for the door, it has instead caused accident and a tragedy.

After the case, the Department of Health suggested that risk assessments should be carried out on all fire door closing devices to assess appropriate closing times, taking into account the occupancy of the building. For facilities managers who are ‘self-taught’ and have little knowledge in these electro-magnetic devices and risk assessments, we can immediately see how ongoing training in this area will benefit them.

 The impact on health and safety compliance

 Without question, the role of the facilities manager is to guarantee the health and safety of occupants, and there are strict guidelines and classifications to door hardware that must be met.

However, the varying level and difference in understanding of door hardware leads to different ideas between the supply chain. Architects strive for the aesthetic; facilities managers must comply with health and safety regulations but also meet budgets; installers and contractors look for products that are retrofit, or quick and easy to install, and choice of hardware becomes based on those factors.

As a result, while compliance standards can be met, these competing forces mean the solution or hardware that is chosen may not be best for the users.

Fire doors are another area that require debate and thought. Heavy in nature, but a necessity to fire safety, they can become dangerous when the hardware used with them does not facilitate easy passage or use. Primary school children may not have the strength to push open doors, while in care homes, mobility and escape in a fire situation becomes an issue.

The easy, perhaps even cost-effective, option would be to select a manual fire door closer, compliant to the weight of the fire door. However, we would advise in these situations to help those building occupants by choosing an electromagnetic door closer instead that is linked to the fire alarm system. In this way, you can legally hold open fire doors, aid daily passage and use, reduce wear and tear and still stay within compliance.

Another case where an electromechanical device could potentially have prevented injury occurred in 2015, where a mother claims her five-year-old daughter lost part of her finger in a fire door at school after being left unsupervised.

Margaret Chan’s daughter got her finger caught in the heavy fire door at Cuddington Croft Primary School in Cheam, Surrey. The incident is claimed to have occurred after the child was left unattended after being “sent back into the school building toilet alone unsupervised via a classroom where there are two fire doors”, said Margaret. The school could not tell the mother what had happened, as the incident was ‘unwitnessed’ (Daily Mail, 2015).

Short-term costs, long-term gains

As with all training, there is an associated cost. It can be hard to see past this cost if benefits are viewed as minimal or not even applicable to current situations. In facilities management, it is even harder to see why we need training in disciplines such as biometrics or computer-aided systems, when traditionally these applications have only been used in select, sensitive buildings.

However, we as manufacturers are constantly exploring technology that can enhance door hardware capabilities and the customer experience, simply because it is our duty to continue innovating for the better. Technologically enhanced door hardware will soon be more accepted as the norm as we become accustomed to the benefits it offers, as well as if costs on such hardware continues to fall.

Therefore, if we do not encourage our facilities managers to train, in the end we are ultimately costing more to our buildings, and to the welfare of our occupants, than the initial outlay of training may be suggesting.

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Dura Cladding Helps New Landmark Development at Rushden Lakes Achieve its Sustainability Goals

Composite Timber Dura Cladding has been chosen for an exciting new retail, leisure and tourism destination in the Nene Valley. The Rushden Lakes site near Northampton is due to open this month and is the largest out-of-town scheme of its kind in a decade.

HPW Architecture led the design and development of the masterplan for the project, which is set in an area of outstanding natural beauty and centres around restoring public access to a network of lakes, as well as offering unrivalled shopping and leisure facilities.

As the development is situated adjacent to a Site of Special Scientific Interest and is a designated nature reserve, it was critical that both the design and construction processes embraced the challenges and opportunities provided by the unique setting. In consultation with the Wildlife Trust and Natural England, HPW designed three net-zero energy buildings (NZEBs), which are clad in Dura Cladding from Dura Composites. Dura Cladding is made from high performance composite timber and is a sustainable alternative to traditional timber made from recycled materials. Dura Cladding is also 100% Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®) Certified and offers superb low maintenance properties as well as an attractive finish that looks just like natural wood but doesn’t ever require treating, painting or staining.

The net-zero energy buildings comprise of the Boathouse, Wildlife Trust Visitors Centre and the Management Office which are distinguished from other buildings in the development through the use of Dura Cladding Type 150 Flush in Cedar colour. All three buildings are super-insulated with all required energy for operation generated on-site to keep running costs to a minimum.

The anchor retail buildings on the terraces including House of Fraser have been part clad in Dura Cladding Type 150 Flush in Grey to provide a contrasting finish whilst retaining the aesthetic look, durability, UV performance and sustainable credentials that the developers were looking for.

Commenting on the project, Gary Wilburn, director of design and sustainability for HPW said: “This is a unique project and one which we have been delighted to have been involved in right from the concept stage 8 years ago. At HPW we specialise in projects like this where wildlife and the natural surroundings are a key part of the design, and we’re really pleased with the role that the Dura Cladding in both Cedar and Grey have played in helping us maintain that ethos. With a project on this scale it’s important to ensure that the resulting development delivers on all of its promises and the recycled properties of Dura Cladding, together with its FSC® status have helped us to meet our overall sustainability goals. The low-maintenance benefits of a composite timber cladding combined with the peace of mind provided by the product warranty have contributed towards a genuine legacy for future generations of which we are very proud.”

The first phase of the Rushden Lakes development is due to open in July and will be followed by phase two of the scheme, which includes additional shops, restaurants and a 14-screen cinema.

Dura Cladding is available to purchase now through International Timber and selected Jewson branches. The products come in 3 widths and 5 attractive colours and appeals to architects, builders, contractors and commercial property developers looking for an aesthetically pleasing, hard-wearing and low maintenance way to finish the exterior of both new and refurbished buildings.

For more information about Dura Composites, visit the website at http://www.duracomposites.com/cladding 

For more information on HPW Architecture, please visit the website at http://www.hpw.co.uk/ and to view the latest video of the development visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GFxF5AQClQ

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Cleaning & Hygiene

Cleanline is an exclusive brand of professional cleaning products and systems from Bunzl Catering Supplies, manufactured in the UK and designed specifically for the catering and hospitality industry.

BFM interviewed Rod Hale, National Account Manager Exclusive Brands, Bunzl Catering Supplies:

What does a venue’s hygiene say about it to customers?

People often judge the quality of an establishment by its cleanliness, and no more so than in the washroom area. Toilets and urinals should be spotless and fresh. For toilets we recommend Cleanline acid lime scale remover as it can be used in hard water areas. All urinals need urinal blocks because they act continuously to clean and fragrance.

Which are the most important parts of a venue to be kept clean – bedrooms, toilets, kitchen, etc.?

It’s a fact that commercial kitchens can get very dirty. Surfaces need to be regularly cleaned and sanitised, equipment needs to be washed so it’s free from contamination and floors need to be clean and dry to prevent slippages. Throughout the shift, after the shift, end of the day, weekly, monthly and annual cleaning tasks should be structured and highlighted to your staff, so they are aware of their responsibilities and when tasks need completing. Some cleaning jobs should be done several times a day, while others need to only be done weekly or monthly. Regular cleaning of your kitchen is essential for food safety and can help reduce food waste, lowering overall menu costs.

The new Cleanline colour-coded professional kitchen kit makes two-stage cleaning in the kitchen simpler and more cost-effective for catering and hospitality businesses of all sizes.

How important is staff training when it comes to hygiene? Is it worth hiring professional cleaners to do the work?

Good practical training is a major factor in getting the best out of cleaning products.  If new starters are not shown exactly what to do as soon as they start, then they will simply do what they think is best and quickly establish a routine of bad practices. On the first day, new employees would benefit from a visit to the cleaning store with an explanation of what each product is for, followed by an overview of the daily cleaning regime.

What technological advances have been made in the hygiene world in recent months? What effect have they had?

The Cleanline COSHH training and product resource e-learning website is available to help employees use cleaning products safely, and in a manner compliant with Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH). It does this by providing free COSHH awareness training through a selection of videos and multiple-choice questions, and can be completed online in under 15 minutes. Successful completion of the training is automatically flagged to a customer administrator, who can access and download user reports via the Admin tab. Perfect for regular COSHH awareness training or completed as part of an induction; new starters can be COSHH aware even before stepping on site.

What advice would you offer to operators looking to keep their venues clean?

  • Choose your chemical supplier carefully
    Many chemical suppliers include a comprehensive support package in the price of their products. This can be made up of practical training, COSHH training, maintenance visits, emergency call outs, wall charts and dispensing equipment. Make sure you’re getting the best value for money.
  • Safety Data Sheets
    Make sure you have one for every cleaning product in use and that everybody knows where they are kept in case there’s an emergency.
  • Use colour coded cleaning products
    With over one hundred languages spoken in the British workplace today, it is impossible to have so many written instructions for using cleaning products. Liquid cleaning products that are the same colour as their labels, dispensers and wall chart references are universally understood.
  • Use concentrated products
    Mixing concentrated products with water on site with a chemical dispenser is not only the most cost effective way of cleaning, it is also greener than using domestic type ready-to-use products. Constant re-use of trigger sprays means less plastic for landfill, less transportation, fewer fossil fuels used and a smaller carbon footprint.
    Super concentrated cleaning products in the Cleanline Super range are diluted through wall-mounted dosing systems for ultimate control and measurable cost in use. Diluted at point of use, super concentrate products use reduced packaging waste, take up less space on a vehicle, reducing the impact on the environment.
  • Make sure your products are at the correct strength
    It’s a common myth that a stronger product does a better job, but with an alkali based floor cleaner for example, too strong a solution will leave an unsightly white deposit. Use the right items to apply the products with; if you use a damp cloth to apply glass polish it will result in visible smudges – clean, dry disposable paper is best.
  • Ensure that the FSA’s Two Stage Clean advice is understood and enacted
    The Food Standards Agency’s Two Stage Clean guidelines are clear: Stage 1 is cleaning food preparation surfaces. Stage 2 is sanitising those surfaces. Train your staff to carry out two distinct and separate jobs.
  • Water Softener
    It easy to forget to maintain this vital piece of equipment. Make sure that replenishing it with salt is part of the routine and get it serviced regularly. Hard water leads to tannin staining, poor results and wrecks expensive dishwashers.
  • Allocate routine cleaning tasks to individuals
    If individuals have ownership of specific tasks, personal pride and accountability increase the likelihood of a good job being completed.
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Innovative In-Situ Office Server Cooling Solution from British engineers.

Without air-conditioned rooms, keeping servers cool on-site in office and business environments is a challenge. Now a British engineering company has developed an innovative energy-efficient temperature control solution called Maxi-Cool for office-based servers. The compact Maxi-Cool system comprises an attractive floor-standing rack cabinet featuring an integrated intelligent refrigeration module to provide highly effective thermal management for servers mounted within.

The Maxi-Cool product is available in a variety of sizes to accommodate single or small numbers of servers in its rack-mount form factor. Maxi-Cool cabinets can be supplied colour-coded to match an organisation’s corporate branding or office décor. One key advantage on offer to businesses looking to cool their servers to safeguard company data is the ease of installation. Maxi-Cool cabinets are simply wheeled into place, the servers installed in the rack space as usual, and the unit plugged into a 13-amp mains socket. Such cost-effective server cooling, typically delivering temperature reductions of up to 20°C with a thermal power capacity of 4kW, is unachievable in any other way.

“Local server installations are popular among small and medium sized firms, where on-site information storage and direct access is preferred for reasons of data sensitivity and security,” explains Maxi-Cool MD and Chief Designer James Garson. “Even where server performance is mission-critical, few businesses can justify the cost and disruption of building a dedicated air-conditioned server room. That’s why we designed Maxi-Cool – to deliver a straightforward solution to a widespread problem.”

Maxi-Cool units are also finding favour in shared office facilities and among professional firms like lawyers and banks who often occupy listed or heritage buildings. “In such sensitive premises, air conditioning plant cannot be installed,” Garson explains. “Maxi-Cool cabinets can provide these businesses with an immediate and effective thermal management option at a fraction of the cost,” he adds.

Aside from the simplicity of installation and low cost, Maxi-Cool cabinets offer distinct commercial advantages over dedicated server rooms. The low-power units operate from a single 230V mains supply, can be easily repositioned on castors if required, are whisper-quiet at just 65db, take up just one square metre of floorspace – and require no structural changes to walls or buildings. In addition, expansion is simply a case of adding another Maxi-Cool cabinet. Smaller Maxi-Cool cabinet configurations are designed expressly to fit in confined spaces.

Maxi-Cool cabinets meet the technical specifications and thermal gradient guidelines issued by global trade body ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) for server cooling applications.

More information available at www.maxi-cool.co.uk

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